What does a Best-Hall building cost? Here`s how to find out

Written by Jan Hildén 20/03/2019

Insufficient specification of initial data is one of the most typical stumbling blocks of building projects. In other words, people tend to place orders without proper plans. Often the first question I get asked is the one in the title. Unfortunately, it is impossible to answer definitively since every building is constructed on a case-by-case basis depending on its purpose of use and location. 

To help every current and potential future owner of a Best-Hall building to make the right choices in terms of features and price, I decided to compile a list of the essentials that cannot be bypassed in the design process. But first, a few words about the importance of planning in general:

  • In construction, it is a well-known rule of thumb that planning constitutes only about 5% of construction costs but defines up to 80% of them, and the same goes for fabric-covered PVC or steel buildings. Cutting corners in planning gets expensive fast, no matter how tight the schedule and how much goods you have waiting for storage.
  • The planning process is not as difficult as it might initially seem – with a proficient partner, it can actually be relatively easy. We prepare plans on a daily basis and have seen almost everything, including what happens when a building is purchased without the proper planning.
  • Despite outward similarities, no two storage buildings are exactly the same. Normally there is enough variation in at least the door positions or the requirements of the building site to warrant different frame structures and installation solutions.

Three things that cannot be ignored in planning

The purpose of the planning process is not to provide something to do for the supplier’s planning department. The idea is to have comprehensive and accurate initial data for cost calculation and implementation right from the start of the project. This minimises delays and unnecessary extra costs during construction. In industrial construction, every change requires the preparation of new structural plans, so any impromptu alterations at the worksite push the entire process back to the drawing board.

The following three broader questions are covered in the design phase:

1. What is the building’s purpose of use?

The requirements for timber storages, food warehouses or logistics buildings are very different in terms of space, ventilation and insulation. In a logistics building, it can be essential to integrate conveyors and cranes in the steel frame. In a building where large volumes of goods are moved around frequently, it is also important to take the efficiency of storage and product handling into account. Considering the purpose of use is the starting point of the process. Sometimes, going over the essentials with an expert can result in five-figure savings!

Bridge crane in a Best-Hall

2. What kind of requirements does the location impose?

The more demanding the conditions of the building site, the more impact the location has on the planning. Does the building need to withstand harsh weather, such as winds? Does the site feature a lot of differences in elevation that need to be considered in the planning of the structure and frame joints? Which official regulations apply to the location? As an example, the positioning of the building within the plot may be extremely important from the perspective of construction costs. Including an expert in the early phase is always a good idea.

Best-Hall superstructure membrane cladded building

3. Do you have special visual or functional requirements?

With increasing frequency, storage buildings and production halls are expected to be visually impressive and meet certain special functional needs. Are you in need of a large contiguous space or extreme durability? Currently, larger and larger buildings are being implemented as PVC-covered steel structures instead of more traditional buildings, providing a competent alternative for a variety of purposes.

Covering these three questions ensures a set of realistic initial data, which can serve as the basis for the actual implementation planning. Based on this information, our designers prepare strength calculations, specific production drawings, quantity estimates and cost calculations, resulting in an offer and project plan that meet your needs down to the smallest detail.

Best-Hall unique look with logos

In construction, it is a well-known rule of thumb that planning constitutes only about 5% of construction costs but defines up to 80% of them, and the same goes for fabric-covered PVC or steel buildings. Cutting corners in planning gets expensive fast, no matter how tight the schedule and how much goods you have waiting for storage.

Need more space? Contact us and we will design a venue that is sure to last for generations. If you get the process started quickly, you can have your venue open in just a few months!

Jan Hildén

Business Operations Manager

+358 40 730 7952 jan.hilden@besthall.com
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